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Rebecca Rideal

Rebecca Rideal
Founder and editor of The History Vault, Rebecca is a historian of seventeenth-century England, a former specialist factual television producer, and the author of 1666: Plague, War and Hellfire.

1668 Almanac

No one tells you this, but one of the best things about conducting historical research is the opportunity to play detective. In truth, there is much even specialists do not know about their period of expertise. Part of being a historian is using the skills you have acquired at university (or on the job) to get to the bottom of enigmatic source …

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History on the Box

Apple Tree Yard has finished, Endeavour is over and Sherlock is no more. What can history-loving TV fans watch next? Here’s a few suggestions: The Last Kingdom (BBC) I genuinely think this was one of the best historical dramas of 2015, and that’s saying a lot (this was the year of Wolf Hall, after all). BBC currently has half the …

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History Masterclass – Review

‘If historians neglect to educate the public, if they fail to interest it intelligently in the past, then all their historical learning is useless except insofar as it educates themselves’. G. M. Trevelyan A couple of weeks ago, I was fortunate enough to attend the first History Masterclass – a new lecture/seminar series launched by Dr Suzannah Lipscomb and Dr …

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Rebecca Rideal reviews “A Million Years in a Day” by Greg Jenner

A Million Years in a Day By Greg Jenner Weidenfeld & Nicolson RRP £12.99 Like many of the best ideas, the premise behind Greg Jenner’s debut book is extraordinarily simple – to trace the history of everyday life through the prism of a modern Saturday. Opening with ‘9.30 a.m. Rise and Shine’, each chapter deals with a different part of …

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Rebecca Rideal reviews “Deus Vult” by Jem Duducu

Deus Vult: A Concise History Of The Crusades By Jem Duducu Amberley Publishing (2014) In 312AD, the Roman Empire was in the grips of civil war. Torn between rival emperors Constantine and Maxentius, events reached a crescendo with the Battle of Milvian Bridge. On the eve of the battle Constantine had visions of Jesus and decided to adorn his troops …

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Tom Bradby Interview: Writing The Great Fire

The Great Fire writer on creating ITV’s new drama “It’s a health and safety nightmare!” It’s the end of April and I’m sitting under a gazebo in the middle of the Oxfordshire countryside with screenwriter, author and ITV News political editor Tom Bradby. We’re sitting next to an impressive recreation of seventeenth-century London – complete with timber buildings, narrow streets and …

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Crowd-funding History?

Earlier this year, something incredible happened. UCL accepted my PhD application. Granted, this news is of little interest to almost anyone outside my immediate family (and even they get bored of my chatter). Nevertheless, next month I am set to begin my research into the ‘spaces and places’ of Restoration London, and I cannot wait. There’s just one thing – …

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Extradition – A Very Brief History

In October 2012, British Home Secretary Theresa May announced that computer hacker Gary McKinnon would not be extradited to the USA. It marked the end of a ten-year battle. Some commentators argued that the request for extradition should never have been made in the first place and that, once again, it highlighted the unequal Anglo-American extradition treaty. McKinnon, who suffers …

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