Home / Issue 3

Issue 3

Robespierre – The Face of the French Revolution

Experts have used Maximilien de Robespierre’s death mask, created after his beheading, to make a startling facial reconstruction. The likeness is the work of facial reconstruction expert, Phillipe Froesch, who used a death mask that had originally been created by Madame Tussaud. Froesch added soft tissue markers to the image of the face and clad it in a virtual skin before sculpting the …

Read More »

Behind the Scenes at the new Stonehenge Exhibition Centre

Stonehenge Opens its £27 million Exhibition Centre There’s no skirting the issue, Stonehenge is a really big deal for English Heritage. It is a globally known landmark that has lacked a solid tourist friendly exhibition centre for far too long. Their approach to this issue is not only a statement about the site, but a wider statement about how heritage …

Read More »

Rebecca Rideal Reviews ‘The Gin Lane Gazette’ by Adrian Teal

The Gin Lane Gazette Adrian Teal Unbound (2013) What an Age! What a time to walk the Earth! At the end of the eighteenth century, London was a gleaming metropolis with a population of well over a million, whose inhabitants had their fill of coffee houses, ale houses, theatres, pleasure gardens and masquerades. Londoners could spend their days reading the latest …

Read More »

Jesus is the most famous person in history, followed by Napoleon and then Muhammad.

Jesus is the most famous person in history, followed by Napoleon and then Muhammad. A new book has ranked the most famous figures from history according to internet based meme strength and historical reputations (whatever that means). The book, Who’s Bigger? Where Historical Figures Really Rank (Cambridge University Press, 2013), is the brainchild of Steven Skiena and Charles Ward and …

Read More »

Unlocking Bag End: Tolkien and the Victorian Arts and Crafts Movement

In a hole in the ground there was a library, a billiard room, not to mention a luxurious smoking room with comfortable seats soft enough to get lost in.  Above there would seem to be rolling hills, and a nice round window looks out onto lush views of an idyllic countryside.  This idyllic retreat is not set in JRR Tolkien’s …

Read More »

St Nicholas: Naughty or Nice?

In the Western world, Christmas is a time to celebrate, either to mark the birth of Christ or enjoy more pagan revelries. Although Christmas is celebrated at different times across Europe (in many countries, the main event takes place on 6 December – St Nicholas’ Day), at the heart of the holidays is a figure who rewards good children with …

Read More »

The Shock of the Frontline: Psychological Trauma in the Great War

As the centenary of the outbreak of World War I approaches, we will be encouraged to remember the fallen of a conflict that tore the world apart. Official commemorations, exhibitions, books and television series will echo the sequence of events a century ago. The bravery and heroism of soldiers who endured the trenches will be foremost in the public consciousness, …

Read More »

Five Minutes With… Simon Stirling

Simon Andrew Stirling is an author and historian whose latest book, “Who Killed William Shakespeare? The Murderer, the Motive, the Means”, was published by the History Press in August 2013.  His previous book, “The King Arthur Conspiracy: How a Scottish Prince Became a Mythical Hero”, was also published by the History Press in 2012.  Simon’s blog, in which he reveals …

Read More »