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Issue 16

David Tiedemann reviews ‘Clinton’s Grand Strategy’ by James D. Boys

What separates grand foreign policy strategy from simple opportunism?  This is the question that Clinton’s Grand Strategy, US Foreign Policy in a Post-Cold War World, by James D. Boys, struggles with.  The book attempts to defend the Clinton Administration from charges by critics that the president’s foreign policy was ad-hoc, and without an ideological grounding.  While the author is willing to explain Bill Clinton’s policy …

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World War One: Breaking the trench stalemate

As the commemorations of World War One grind on, there’s a pattern that seems to have been ignored by almost all media and historians. Curious? Then read on… One of the fears of Germany prior to the war was potentially becoming surrounded by hostile nations. So Germany was constantly looking for diplomatic ways to ease this pressure. This resulted in …

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Simon de Montfort and all this Parliament business

In this first biography of Simon de Montfort in nearly twenty years, Darren Baker reveals a revolutionary figure who did in fact play a major role in the development of the English parliament. As part of a virtual tour he is undertaking for the book, he explains in this guest article below how that came to pass. Imagine you are about …

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The response to Charlie Hebdo and the Imperial Hangover in France

As economic underperformance, loss of sovereignty and German domination of the EU grind away at French self-esteem, contemporary France is also divided by chronic and deep-rooted anti-Semitism and Islamophobia. French Jews were leaving the country for Israel, the UK, Canada and the United States in their thousands long before the latest atrocities in Paris. Many Muslims in France continue to …

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The Nazi “super weapon” so dangerous the Nazis never used it

New chemical compounds are discovered or created regularly, some are created where the properties can already be guessed at, others are complete surprises, in 1930 a new compound was discovered by Ruff and Krug in Germany. It was very volatile so was ignored until a few years later interest was rekindled by Nazi scientists at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute. It …

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Rebecca Rideal reviews “A Million Years in a Day” by Greg Jenner

A Million Years in a Day By Greg Jenner Weidenfeld & Nicolson RRP £12.99 Like many of the best ideas, the premise behind Greg Jenner’s debut book is extraordinarily simple – to trace the history of everyday life through the prism of a modern Saturday. Opening with ‘9.30 a.m. Rise and Shine’, each chapter deals with a different part of …

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The Radium Craze – America’s Lethal Love Affair by Matthew Moss

At the beginning of the 20th century America became gripped by a dangerous phenomenon. Radium had been discovered in 1898 and was quickly hailed as a miracle element. The radioactive metal’s unusual and unique properties captured the imaginations of both the scientific community and the public. Within forty years radium had permeated American society to the point where it was …

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Taking Back Tyburn by Jessica Cale

Tyburn. Once enough to send a shiver down the spine of anyone in London or greater Middlesex, these infamous gallows have at last begun to fade from collective memory. Eight times a year, Tyburn served as the place of execution for the condemned from the courts of Westminster, the Guildhall, Middlesex, and the Old Bailey Sessions. Between 1196 and 1783, …

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Kathryn Johnson Reviews “A World Elsewhere” by Sigrid MacRae

“A World Elsewhere” by Sigrid MacRae is a book with many different stories. On the surface, it’s a look at wartime Germany from the inside, but as you read on, you realize that it’s far, far more than that. This is the story of an outsiders view from the inside, of the authors American mother living in wartime Germany; the …

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Rebecca Rideal reviews “Deus Vult” by Jem Duducu

Deus Vult: A Concise History Of The Crusades By Jem Duducu Amberley Publishing (2014) In 312AD, the Roman Empire was in the grips of civil war. Torn between rival emperors Constantine and Maxentius, events reached a crescendo with the Battle of Milvian Bridge. On the eve of the battle Constantine had visions of Jesus and decided to adorn his troops …

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